CDC Dental Guidelines and Infection Control

Infectious diseases are present everywhere. They can spread directly or indirectly. Bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, and other microorganisms can be passed on through direct contact with another person, through contaminated food and water, soiled objects, and through the air.

Since dental clinics provide services for oral health for various patients daily, the risk for infection is very high.

Dental personnel can be exposed to a variety of microorganisms during dental operations through patients’ blood and saliva. All employees in a dental office must be briefed about each patient’s medical history, knowledgeable in the use of Personal Protective Equipment, mindful of handwashing before and after every dental procedure, experienced with the use of sharp instruments and needles and high-level disinfection, and follow proper disposal of pathogenic materials and decontamination of environmental surfaces.

Our CDC Infection Control Training Covers

Hayes Handpiece Repair is staffed with experts in CDC guidelines for dental handpiece sterilization and infection control.

Our training include:

  • Staff Training On Infection Control Best Practice
  • CDC Dental Handpiece Sterilization and Maintenance
  • OSHA Compliance Training

The CDC Guidelines and Infection Control ensure that standard precautions are being adhered to in controlling, stopping, and preventing the spread of infectious diseases.

Some bacteria and viruses can be associated with far more concerning infectious diseases such as COVID-19, Tuberculosis, Hepatitis, and HIV.

Undergoing CDC Guidelines and Infection Control Training can also help your dental office stay OSHA Compliant.

Everyone who is working in a dental office or dental facility.

This includes:

  • Dentists
  • Dental hygienists
  • Dental assistants
  • Dental laboratory technicians (in-office and commercial)
  • Dental students and trainees
  • Contractual dental personnel
  • Other persons not directly involved in patient care but potentially exposed to infectious agents (e.g., administrative, clerical, housekeeping, maintenance, or volunteer personnel)

The CDC Standard Precautions are the following:

  1. Hand hygiene.
  2. Use of personal protective equipment (e.g., gloves, masks, eyewear).
  3. Respiratory hygiene/cough etiquette.
  4. Sharps instruments safety (engineering and work practice controls).
  5. Safe injection practices (i.e., an aseptic technique for parenteral medications).
  6. Sterile instruments and devices.
  7. Clean and disinfected environmental surfaces.

Staff Training On Infection Control Best Practice

Ensuring that your staff is properly trained is your best option to reduce contaminants within your surgery environment.

Our Hayes representative can come to you to deliver a training session that is not only important for your practice but fun for your staff.

Staff will get a better understanding of how to take care of your instruments while operating at maximum efficiency.

We will cover the correct procedures for:

  • Pre soaking instruments
  • Cleaning and drying techniques
  • Sterilization procedures
  • How to improve the life of your sterilizer.

Handpiece Maintenance and Sterilization

When equipment is not maintained correctly this is the main cause for handpiece failure.

If a handpiece fails then this can be costly in both lost time but also premature replacement costs.

By educating your staff then you can extend the life of your handpieces to get the maximum use from them.

Whether you have new staff or existing staff that just need a refresher this is perfect to go through the correct procedure for maintaining high-speeds, low-speed motors, swivels, scalers, surgical drills and attachments.

A Hayes trained representatives will run through the different options for lubricants and cleaners, flushing autoclaves and how to get faster drying times from your sterilizer.

COVID-19 Resources

According to the CDC’s Guideline for Disinfection and Sterilization in Healthcare Facilities, many disinfectants are used alone or in combinations (e.g., hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid) in the health-care setting and the COVID-19 Disinfection. These include alcohols, chlorine and chlorine compounds, formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, ortho-phthalaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, iodophors, peracetic acid, phenolics, and quaternary ammonium compounds. Commercial formulation must be registered with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or approved by FDA.

Commercial formulations must be used with precaution and appropriate formulation. Incorrect use or excessive formulation can result in health risks when inhaled by employees or patients within the dental facility.

To learn more about the approved list of COVID-19 disinfectants and disinfection guidelines, you may visit the references below:

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To book, please fill in the form below or call 800.228.0521

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